Lesson Plans

LESSON PLANS

Teacher’s Resource Book

This resource book is intended to provide you with the background information necessary to teach the essentials of Emergency Preparedness. In the following pages you will find key definitions, information about emergency survival kits, as well as, a detailed list of resources (websites, books, etc).

Before you begin a lesson, be sure to advise students that you are teaching them about emergency preparedness so they know what actions they can take to make themselves and their families safer and more comfortable should an emergency occur.

Since the topic of emergencies can be frightening to some children, it is important to allow students the opportunity to ask questions and share feelings. You may wish to send a letter home to parents in advance letting them know you will be teaching the lesson and encouraging them to discuss the topic with their children.

Definitions

Community Emergency Management Coordinator

The individual officially designated by a community who is responsible and accountable for the community emergency management program. The Community Emergency Management Coordinator must be, by definition, a municipal employee, as per the Municipal Act. You can contact your local coordinator through your municipal government office.

Disaster

A widespread or severe emergency that seriously incapacitates a community.

Emergency

A situation or impending situation that constitutes a danger of major proportions that could result in serious harm to persons or substantial damage to property and that is caused by the forces of nature, a disease or other health risk, an accident, or an act whether intentional or otherwise.

Emergencies can affect one person (medical emergency – individual choking), a few people (house fire) or an entire neighbourhood (power outage).

Emergency Management Ontario

The organization within the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services, government of the Province of Ontario, responsible for monitoring, coordinating and assisting in the promotion, development, and maintenance of emergency management programs in Ontario.

Emergency Plan

As per the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, a plan that provides the details of the emergency management program of an organization (such as a ministry or a municipality).

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency preparedness refers to the actions taken prior to an emergency or disaster to ensure an effective response. These actions include the formation of an emergency plan, public awareness and education and training.

Human-Caused Emergency

An emergency that is the direct result of human actions (e.g., terrorism, sabotage).

Natural Emergency

An emergency resulting from the forces of nature (e.g., atmospheric, geological, and hydrological such as tornadoes, earthquakes and floods). Sometimes a natural emergency can cause a secondary technological emergency such as when a severe storm damages hydro lines and causes a power outage.

Technological Emergency

An emergency resulting from the manufacture, transportation, and use of technology or certain substances (e.g., radioactive materials, chemicals, modern technology, infrastructure).

Emergency Survival Kit

Being prepared for an emergency includes the preparation of an emergency survival kit. An emergency survival kit contains all of the items that you need to remain comfortable for at least three days during an emergency.

It is important that the contents of your emergency survival kit are kept all together in an easy to carry container or bag in the event you have to leave your home suddenly. This will ensure you have all of your basic supplies with you. Your emergency survival kit should be kept in an easy-to-reach location and everyone in your family should know where it is stored.

Below is a list of basic items that every individual should have:

Flashlight - A flashlight is very important in an emergency, especially if the power goes out. A crank flashlight is a flashlight that works without using batteries or electricity. If you decide to include battery-operated flashlights in your emergency survival kit, make sure that you know what type of batteries they use and have extra batteries in your kit.

Radio - A radio will allow you to hear news about what is happening and get information about how to stay safe. A crank radio is a radio that works without using batteries or electricity. If you decide to include a battery-operated radio in your emergency survival kit, make sure that you know what type of batteries it uses and have extra batteries in your kit.

First Aid Kit - Your family’s emergency survival kit should include a first aid kit. It can be helpful if someone gets hurt.

Candles/Matches/Lighter - Candles provide light and heat. Always keep candles in a cleared space away from anything that could catch fire. Candles should never be left unattended in a room and an adult should always be in a room where a candle is lit.

Extra Car Keys and Cash – Include extra car keys as do not want to be running around looking for them. It is also very important to keep some money in your emergency survival kit. If an emergency causes a power outage, things that require electricity, like banking machines will not work and banks may be closed. You should keep small bills ($5 and $10 bills) and change (quarters, loonies and toonies) in your kit. Remember to put these items in a waterproof bag so they do not get damaged.

Important Papers - It is a good idea to put a list of important telephone numbers in your emergency survival kit. This list should include the telephone numbers for your parent/guardian, school, doctor’s office, etc.

Food and can opener - In an emergency, it may be too dangerous to go outside and stores may have to stay closed. If the emergency causes a power outage, you will not be able to cook food. If the power is out for a long period of time, the food in your refrigerator will no longer be safe to eat. The food that you put in your emergency survival kit needs to be non-perishable (does not need to go in the refrigerator). Some examples of food that could be in an emergency survival kit are canned fruit, crackers, ready-to-eat pasta, tuna and granola bars. If your survival kit has canned food, you will need a can opener. Check the food in your kit twice a year to make sure it is fresh and tastes good when/if you need to use it.

Bottled Water - In an emergency, you may not have any water coming out of your taps, or the water coming out may be unclean and not safe to drink or use. The water that you put in your emergency survival kit is very important and can be used for cleaning, drinking and cooking. You should include 12 litres of water for each person in your family (4 litres of water per person per day and your kit needs to last you at least 3 days). Check the water every 6 months (it can expire).

Blankets/Sleeping Bag - Blankets and/or sleeping bags will help keep you warm in an emergency. If an emergency causes a power outage in the late fall, winter or early spring, it could get very cold in your house because there is no electricity to run your furnace.

Personal Items - In an emergency, you may not be able to go outside or get to the store. Make sure that you have enough personal items like toilet paper, a toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, a hairbrush, shampoo, facecloths and towels.

Clothing and footwear - It is important that your emergency survival kit has extra clothing and shoes for each member of the family. The clothing/shoes you put in the emergency survival kit should be appropriate for the season. Don’t forget things like extra socks and underwear!

Whistle - A whistle is a good thing to include in your emergency survival kit. A whistle can make a loud noise to catch the attention of other people if you need help.

Playing Cards/Games - You may want to include games and/or toys in your emergency survival kit to keep you busy and help pass the time. Some things that you can include in your kit are books, playing cards, paper and crayons. You may also want to add a stuffed animal or toy in your emergency survival kit.

Backpack - It is important that all of the items that belong in your family’s emergency survival kit be kept together in one place. A backpack or duffel bag is a good way to store all your emergency survival kit items. Each member of the family should have their own personal survival kit in case you need to evacuate.

Remember that families with babies and toddlers will have additional needs. You may need to include things like diapers, baby food and formula, bottles/sippy cups, toys, etc.

As well, if you or someone in your family needs to take medicine everyday, you need to make sure that you have a supply of that medicine in your emergency survival kit and/or talk to a doctor about what to do in an emergency. Make sure that you keep a list of the medicines that each person in the family takes and why they take the medicine.

Emergencies / Hazards

Thunderstorms

What is a Thunderstorm?

Thunderstorms happen when warm moist air meets up with cold dry air. As the warm air rises up and over the cold air, a thunderstorm can form. Thunderstorms are most common in the spring and summer, but they can occur any time of the year.

Most thunderstorms are not severe, but all thunderstorms produce lightning which can be very dangerous. Lightning is seen before the thunder is heard because light travels faster than sound. This means you may see lightning flashes but have to wait before the thunder is heard. When you see the lightning and the thunder is heard right away, the lightning is nearby.

Thunderstorms are also dangerous because they can produce heavy rain, hail, strong winds and in some cases, tornadoes.

How Will I Know If There Is Going To Be A Thunderstorm?

Environment Canada lets people know when thunderstorms could develop by putting out a thunderstorm watch or warning. These are broadcast by local radio and television stations.

A thunderstorm warning is more severe than a thunderstorm watch but there are things that you can do to prepare for both. If a thunderstorm watch or warning has been put out for where you live, you should be prepared to bring in lawn furniture, change outdoor plans and bring your pets indoors. Make sure to listen for updates in case the storm gets worse.

How Can I Stay Safe In A Thunderstorm?

Here are some things to remember:

  1. Use the 30-30 rule. Environment Canada recommends using the 30-30 rule when it comes to lightning safety. Count the seconds between seeing the lightning and hearing the thunder. If this time is 30 seconds or less, then the lightning could hurt you. You should go somewhere safe right away (indoors in best). After you see the last lightning flash from the thunderstorm, wait 30 minutes before leaving your safe place.
  2. Know what to do if you are stuck outside in a thunderstorm. If you cannot go indoors during a thunderstorm, go to a low, open space such as a field away from trees. Crouch down, place your hands on your knees and lower your head. Make yourself the smallest target for lightning as possible.
  3. Stay away from tall things like trees, fences and power lines. Lightning likes these objects. Never stand under a tree in a field because lightning will want to go to the tallest object in a field.
  4. Stay away from metal things like golf clubs and fishing rods. Lightning likes metal and will want to go to these things. This can be very dangerous for you if you are touching the metal.
  5. If you are swimming or on a boat, get to land right away and go indoors. Stay away from bodies of water such as lakes, rivers, ponds. Lightning can travel very quickly through the water.
  6. Stay away from running water inside a house. Lightning can come into a house through the pipes and plumbing. This means no showers or baths during a thunderstorm. Do not worry you can get squeaky clean after the thunderstorm has passed.

Floods

What Is A Flood?

Floods are caused by:

  • heavy rain
  • lots of snow melting
  • rivers that become too full and spill over their banks
  • winds that cause large waves to come on to land
  • dams and dikes (structures that hold water behind them) breaking

When there is too much water for the ground to soak up or for rivers/lakes to hold, you get a flood. A flood can happen at any time of year and can happen in many parts of Ontario.

Floods are dangerous because they can sometimes happen very quickly. This is called a flash flood. Even if the water from a flood rises slowly, it can be dangerous. Water from floods can damage buildings, move soil, cause power outages and damage telephone lines.

How Will I Know If There Are Dangerous Water Levels or Flooding?

Your local Water Conservation Authority or the Ministry of Natural Resources lets people know when flooding could happen by putting out a safety bulletin, advisory or warning. These are broadcast by local radio and television stations.

A safety bulletin tells people that water levels are high and unsafe around rivers and lakes. A flood warning is more severe than an advisory.

How Can I Stay Safe If There Are Dangerous Water Levels or Flooding?

Here are some things to remember:

1. If you come across flood waters, stop, turn around and go another way. Try to go to higher ground. Never try to walk or swim through flood waters because even water that is not very deep can knock you over if it is moving fast. There may also be dangerous objects in the water you cannot see and these objects could hurt you.

2. Stay away from the edge of rivers/creeks that have flooded. The edges of rivers/creeks may be soft. When you stand on the soft soil, it may fall into the water and you may fall too.

Tornadoes

What is a Tornado?

A tornado is a cone of spinning air that comes out of a cloud and touches the ground. Tornadoes are most likely to happen May through September but they can happen at other times of the year. Most tornadoes happen in the afternoon or early evening.

Tornadoes are dangerous because they can move quickly and can produce very strong winds that can damage trees and homes. The objects picked up by a tornado can be dangerous as they can get thrown around. Tornadoes can knock out the power lines and telephone lines. If power lines are lying on the ground do not touch them.

How Will I Know If There Is Going To Be A Tornado?

Environment Canada lets people know when tornadoes may happen by putting out a tornado watch or warning. These are broadcast by local radio and television stations.

A tornado warning is more severe than a tornado watch but there are things that you can do to prepare for both. If a tornado watch or warning has been put out for where you live, you should be prepared to bring in lawn furniture, change outdoor plans and bring your pets indoors.

There are tornado danger signs you should watch for:

  • A dark green, yellow or black sky
  • A cloud in the sky that looks like it has a dipping tail
  • A cloud that is moving in circles
  • A loud freight train-like sound

How Can I Stay Safe If There Is A Tornado?

Here are some things to remember:

1. Find the safest place is in your house. It is best to go to the lowest level of a house (the basement is best) and find a space away from windows or tall furniture. If you live in an apartment, you may not have time to get to the lowest floor so it is best to go to a hallway in the middle of the building.

2. If you hear or see a tornado coming, go to a safe place right away. Tornadoes can move very fast.

3. If you are in a car or mobile home, go to the basement of a close building. Cars and mobile homes can be picked up and tossed around by a tornado. If there are not any buildings nearby, lie flat in a low spot on the ground like a ditch.

Earthquakes

What is an Earthquake?

An earthquake is caused when rock breaks or shifts suddenly making the ground shake. Depending on how big the earthquake is, the shaking may continue for many seconds, or several minutes. An earthquake can cause damage to buildings, roads and bridges and can trigger landslides and tsunamis (water waves).

Aftershocks are smaller earthquakes that happen hours, days or weeks after a big earthquake (mainshock). Aftershocks can cause more damage to buildings, roads and bridges that have been weakened by the mainshock.

How Do We Know When An Earthquake Will Happen?

Scientists know where earthquakes are more likely to happen but they do not know when they will happen. Earthquakes can happen at any time of day and at any time of year.

How Can I Stay Safe If There Is An Earthquake?

Here are some things to remember:

1. Ask your parents/guardians to fasten bookcases, cabinets and other tall furniture to the wall. In an earthquake these items can fall over and cause damage or hurt someone.

2. Hang mirrors and pictures away from beds or chairs. Earthquakes can cause things to fall off walls and possibly hurt someone.

3. If you are indoors in an earthquake, drop, hold and cover. Go under a table or desk. Hold on to one of the legs and cover your head. If there is nothing to duck under, crouch in an interior corner of the room or in a doorway. Do not run outside in an earthquake. It is a good idea to walk around your home before an earthquake happens and decide where to go in each room.

4. Wait in a safe place until the shaking stops. When the shaking stops move very carefully and watch for things that are broken or have moved. Be ready for smaller earthquakes called aftershocks that could cause more damage.

5. If you are outside in an earthquake move away from buildings, trees and power lines. Crouch down and cover your head.

Winter Storm

What is a Winter Storm?

Winter storms can produce heavy snow, rain, ice, cold temperatures and strong winds. Winter storms can happen anywhere in Ontario and can last a few hours or a few days.

Winter storms are dangerous for many reasons. Roads and sidewalks can become slippery from ice or become hard to travel on because of heavy snow. The wind and snow together can make it very hard to see when walking or driving and cars may not see you when you are crossing the road.

How Will I Know If There Is Going To Be A Winter Storm?

Environment Canada lets people know when a winter storm could develop by putting out a winter storm watch or warning. These are broadcast by local radio or television stations. If a winter storm watch or warning has been put out for where you live, you should be prepared to change travel plans and bring your pets indoors. Make sure to listen for updates in case the storm gets worse.

How Can I Stay Safe If There Is A Winter Storm?

Here are some things to remember:

1. Stay inside. The safest place to be in a winter storm is inside.

2. Check with your parents/guardian before you go out and play in the snow after a winter storm. It might be too dangerous to play outside because of the ice and extra snow.

Wildfire

What is a Wildfire?

A wildfire, or forest fire, is a fire that happens in a forested area. Wildfires can start because of lightning or because people are not careful with things like campfires. Sometimes fires can start in grassy areas. These are called grassfires. It is possible for a grassfire to move to the trees in a nearby forested area and become a wildfire. Wildfires are dangerous because they can move very quickly and burn everything in their path.

Although forest fires are dangerous to people and communities, they have an important role in nature. Fires help remove old dead and unhealthy trees and allow for the new growth of a young healthy forest. Fires also open up the forest for animal habitats.

How Will I Know If There Is Going To Be A Forest Fire?

The Ministry of Natural Resources usually finds out about wildfires when people call their wildfire reporting telephone number. They also fly airplanes around the province to look for wildfires. Using computers, the Ministry of Natural Resources look at environmental and weather information to find where wildfires are most likely to happen. In these areas with high fire danger, there are often bans on campfires or any sort of burning

How Can I Stay Safe In A Wildfire?

Here are some things to remember:

1. Always follow the instructions given by emergency workers. If you are told to leave your home, do so right away because it means it is not safe to stay.

2. Do not store firewood next to your house if you live in a forested area. Having firewood next to your house could make it easier for fire to reach your home.

3. If you see a wildfire, report it to the Ministry of Natural Resources if you live in northern Ontario or to your local fire department if you live in southern Ontario. Once they know about a wildfire, the Ministry of Natural Resources or your local fire department can begin to work on fighting the fire.

Pets and Emergencies

Just as you would prepare an emergency survival kit for your family, you should prepare another emergency survival kit for your pet. This kit should be kept in an easy to carry bag and stored next to your family’s emergency survival kit.

Your pet emergency survival kit should have:

  • Food, water, bowls, and a can opener
  • Blanket and a small toy
  • Sturdy leash/harness
  • Cat litter/pan (if required) and plastic bags
  • Carrier for transporting your pet
  • Medications and medical records (including vaccinations)
  • Recent photo of your pet in case your pet gets lost
  • Up-to-date ID tag with your phone number and the name/phone number of your veterinarian
  • Copy of license (if required)

What you need in your pet’s emergency survival kit depends on the type of pet you have. Ask your veterinarian if you have questions about what should go into your pet kit.

Remember, your pets are counting on you to keep them safe and comfortable.

Emergency Preparedness Resources

We have made every effort to ensure that all the website pages listed in this booklet are accurate and active as of the date of publication. It is the nature of websites to frequently update and rearrange content. If you find a reference in this resource book that no longer works, please email contact us

Natural Emergency Books – Non-Fiction

(Grouped by Hazard Type)

Atmospheric (Weather) Hazards

Type

Suggested Age Group

Book Title

Author

ISBN

Blizzards

Ice Storms

6-9

Snow and Ice: Canadian Winter Weather

Nicole Mortillaro

043995746X

Blizzards

4-9

Whiteout: A Book About Blizzards

Rick Thomas

9781404809253

Blizzards

Snowstorms

4-9

Flakes and Flurries: A Book about Snow

Josepha Sherman

9781404800984

Blizzards

9-12

Disaster Up Close: Blizzards

Michael Woods

Mary B. Woods

9780822565758

Blizzards

6-8

Wild Weather:

Blizzards!

Lorraine Jean Hopping

978-0590397308

Blizzards

Thunderstorms

Hail

Windstorms

9-12

Severe Storms and Blizzards Alert!

Lynn Peppas

9780778716051

Thunderstorms

Tornadoes

Hurricanes

Blizzards

8-12

Science Matters: Storms

Christine Webster

159036418X

Tornadoes

Ice Storms

Hurricanes

8-12

Canadian Disasters

René Schmidt

043994936X

Thunderstorms

Tornadoes

Hurricanes

9-12

Storms

Simon Seymour

0688117082

Thunderstorms

Tornadoes

Hail

Hurricanes

9-12

Eye Wonder: Weather

Lorrie Mack

0756603234

Thunderstorms

6-9

Sun and Storms: Canadian Summer Weather

Nicole Mortillaro

0439957451

Thunderstorms

4-6

Flash, Crash, Rumble, and Roll

Franklyn Branley

9780064451796

Thunderstorms

4-9

Rumble, Boom!: A Book About Thunderstorms

Rick Thomas

9781404818477

Lightning

4-9

Nature's Fireworks: A Book about Lightning

Joespha Sherman

9781404800939

Lightning

9-12

Lightning

Simon Seymour

9780060884352

Windstorms

4-9

Gusts and Gales: A Book About Wind

Josepha Sherman

9781404803381

Tornadoes

Hail

Hurricanes

Ice Storms

12+

Extreme Canadian Weather: Freakish Storms and Unexpected Disasters

Joan Dixon

1551539497

Tornadoes

9-12

Forces of Nature

Catherine O’Neill Grace

0792263286

Tornadoes

9-12

Heinemann Info Search:

Terrifying Tornadoes

Louise and Richard Spilsbury

1403454477

Tornadoes

4-9

Twisters: A Book about Tornadoes

Rick Thomas

9781404809307

Tornadoes

9-12

Tornadoes

Simon Seymour

9780064437912

Tornadoes

Hurricanes

8-13

I’II Know What To Do: A Kid’s Guide To Natural Disasters

Dr. Bonnie S. Mark

Aviva Layton

9781557984593

Tornadoes

Hurricanes

9-12

DK Eyewitness Guides: Natural Disasters

Claire Watts

9780756620721

Hurricanes

4-9

Eye of the Storm: A Book About Hurricanes

Rick Thomas

9781404809284

Hurricanes

9-12

Disaster Up Close: Hurricanes

Michael Woods and Mary B. Woods

9780822547105

Hurricanes

9-12

Heinemann Info Search:

Howling Hurricanes

Louise and Richard Spilsbury

1403454450

Extreme Heat

4-9

Sizzle: A Book About Heat Waves

Rick Thomas

9781404809277

Atmospheric (Weather) Hazards

Fire Hazards

Type

Suggested Age Group

Book Title

Author

ISBN

Wildfires

Forest Fires

9-12

Heinemann Info Search:

Blazing Bush and Forest Fires

Louise and Richard Spilsbury

1403442290

Forest Fires

9-12

DK Eyewitness Guides: Natural Disasters

Claire Watts

9780756620721

Forest Fires

8-10

Fire!

Celia Godkin

9781554550821

Forest Fires

9-12

Forest Fires!

Anita Ganeri

9781841935638

Fires

8-13

I’II Know What To Do: A Kid’s Guide To Natural Disasters

Dr. Bonnie S. Mark

Aviva Layton

9781557984593

Wildfires

12+

Fire and Floods

N. Barber

0764110586

Wildfires

9-12

Wildfires

Simon Seymour

9780688175306

Fire Hazards

Geological Hazards

Type

Suggested Age Group

Book Title

Author

ISBN

Earthquakes

5-9

Jump into Science: Earthquakes

Ellen J. Prager

9781426300905

Earthquakes

8-13

I’II Know What To Do: A Kid’s Guide To Natural Disasters

Dr. Bonnie S. Mark

Aviva Layton

9781557984593

Earthquakes

9-12

Quakes

Catherine McMorrow

067986945X

Earthquakes

9-12

Earthquakes

Simon Seymour

9780060877156

Volcanoes

Earthquakes

9-12

Forces of Nature

Catherine O’Neill Grace

0792263286

Volcanoes

5-9

Volcanoes

Franklyn M. Branley

0064451895

Earthquakes

Volcanoes

Landslides

9-12

DK Eyewitness Guides: Natural Disasters

Claire Watts

9780756620721

Avalanches Landslides

9-12

Natural Disasters: Avalanches and Landslides

Jane Walker

1932799052

Geological Hazards

Hydrological (Water) Hazards

Type

Suggested Age Group

Book Title

Author

ISBN

Floods

4-9

Rising Waters: A Book About Floods

Rick Thomas

9781404818460

Floods

8-13

I’II Know What To Do: A Kid’s Guide To Natural Disasters

Dr. Bonnie S. Mark

Aviva Layton

9781557984593

Floods

9-12

Floods

Peter Murray

1567662145

Floods

12+

Fire and Floods

N. Barber

0764110586

Floods

9-12

In Time Of Need: Floods

Sean Connolly

1583403906

Floods

Tsunamis

9-12

DK Eyewitness Guides: Natural Disasters

Claire Watts

9780756620721

Tsunamis

9-12

Heinemann Info Search:

Sweeping Tsunamis

Louise and Richard Spilsbury

1-4034-4233-9

Tsunamis

9-12

Oceans

Simon Seymour

9780060889999

Hydrological (Water) Hazards

Natural Emergency Books - Fiction

Storybooks

Hazard Type/Topic

Suggested Age Group

Book Title

Author

ISBN

Blizzard

5-8

Terrible Storm

Carol Otis Hurst

9780060090012

Blizzard

6-8

The Blizzard

Betty Ren Wright

0823416569

Thunderstorms

4-8

Walter Was Worried

Laura Vaccaro Seeger

1596431962

Thunderstorms

4-8

Big Wind Coming!

Karen English

0807507261

Thunderstorms

4-8

Like A Hundred Drums

Annette Griessman

9780618558780

Thunderstorms

3-6

Franklin and the Thunderstorm

Paulett Bourgeois

1550744054

Thunderstorms

4-8

The Berenstain Bears Count Their Blessings

Stan & Jan Berenstain

067987707X

Thunderstorms

4-6

City Storm

Mary Jessie Parker

059042307X

Forest Fires

4-8

Trouble Coming!

Christine Harris

0091769795

Forest Fires

6-8

Firestorm!

Jean Craighead George

0060002638

Hurricanes

4-8

Hurricane!

Corinne Demas

0761450521

Hurricanes

5-8

Yesterday We Had A Hurricane

Deirdre McLaughlin Mercier

9780975434253

Hurricanes

3-5

Clifford and the Big Storm

Norman Bridwell

9780590257558

Volcanoes

6-9

Magic School Bus Blows Its Top: A Book about Volcanoes

Gail Herman

Joanna Cole

9780590508353

Earthquakes

4-8

Francis, the Earthquake Dog

J. Enderle

S. Tessler

9780811806305

Earthquakes

6-9

Earthquake

Milly Lee

9780374419462

Tsunamis

8-12

Eli the Elephant: A Tsunami Story

Margaret Donald

Sophia Grant

9788183860246

Avalanches

6-10

Snowboard Twist

Jean Craighead George

9780060505967

Drought

5-8

Farley the Ferret of Farkleberry Farm

Patricia Derrick

9781933818122

Drought

4-8

Sweet Potato Pie

Kathleen D. Lindsey

9781600602771

Extreme Heat

4-8

Heat Wave

Eileen Spinelli

Betsy Lewin

9780152167790

Floods

4-8

Come A Tide

George Ella Lyon

9780531070369

Floods

6-9

Flood

Mary Calhoun

9780688139193

Floods

6-9

The Big Flood

Wendy Pfeffer

9780761316534

Storybooks

Emergency Preparedness Books - Non-Fiction

Emergency Preparedness Books

Topic

Suggested Age Group

Book Title

Author

ISBN

Emergency Responders

2-5

Emergency!

Margaret Mayo

9781846167614

Fire Fighters

4-8

Canadian Fire Fighters

Paulette Bourgeois

9781550740424

Fire Fighters

4-9

DK Readers: Jobs People Do: A Day in a Life of a Firefighter

Linda Hayward

9780789473653

Police Officers

5-7

Hard Work Series: A Day With Police Officers

Jan Kottke

9780516230177

Police Officers

4-8

Canadian Police Officers

Paulette Bourgeois

9781550741339

Paramedics

5-7

Hard Work Series: A Day With Paramedics

Jan Kottke

9780516230160

Paramedics

5-11

Everyday Heroes Series: Paramedics

Nichol Bryan

9781577658566

Emergency Preparedness Books