Exercise

EXERCISE

Appendices: Guidelines for the Development of an Exercise Program Templates

Note: These templates have been provided to assist you in the design and conduct of your exercises, and should be used in conjunction with the Guidelines for the Development of an Exercise Program. It is important to note that although these templates are based on recommended practices, they are flexible and can be modified to suit the needs of your particular exercise.


Appendix 1: Phase 1: Work Plan Timeline

The following is a comprehensive Work Plan Timeline. Though quite detailed, it can be modified to suit the needs of your particular exercise, its objectives and degree of complexity, and your available resources.

Work-plan Timeline

Tasks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Foundation

            

Develop work plan timeline

            

Identify exercise team

            

Schedule first planning team conference

            

Develop exercise budget

            

Concept & Objectives Meeting (C&O)

            

Determine exercise scope

            

Initial Planning Conference (IPC)

            

Determine scenario

            

Assign responsibilities & due dates for each task

            

Prepare IPC minutes

            

Final Planning Conference (FPC)

            

Determine exercise venue

            

Conduct exercise site visit

            

Prepare FPC minutes

            

Design and Development

            

Scope

            

Identify design objectives

            

Identify participants

            

Scenario

            

Identify problem

            

Determine conditions

            

Determine date and time for scenario to occur

            

Documentation

            

Develop Exercise Plan (EXPLAN)

            

Develop Evaluation Plan (EVALPLAN)

            

Develop Player Handbook

            

Develop Master Scenario Events List (MSEL)

            

Develop Messages

            

Media/Public Information

            

Develop Statement of Intent for handout

            

Logistics

            

Develop correspondence letters (participant invites, thank letters)

            

Develop mailing lists (players, evaluators, planning team)

            

Provide food/refreshments

            

Safety

            

Determine real emergency procedures (including a codeword)

            

Exercise Staffing

            

Determine exercise staff needs (facilitator, evaluators, support)

            

Briefings

            

Hand out Player Handbook

            

Hand out Evaluator Guide

            

Exercise Control

            

Conduct communications check

            

Conduct equipment check

            

Announce start of exercise

            

Evaluation

            

Player hot-wash

            

Prepare draft After Action Report (AAR)

            

Evaluator Debrief

            

Finalize AAR

            

Improvement Planning

            

Develop Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

            

Track implementation of AAR/IP

            

Work-plan Timeline

Appendix 2: Phase 2, Step 1: Needs Assessment

Hazards: List by priority any problems in the past, and which ones need to be exercised.

Geographical area: Look for areas that are vulnerable to hazards.

Emergency functions: Determine what function needs to be exercised.

  • Alert Notification
  • Communications
  • Coordination
  • Emergency Public Information
  • Damage Assessment
  • Health and Medical
  • Individual/Family Assistance
  • Public Safety
  • Public Works
  • Resource Management
  • Warning
  • Other

Organizations and personnel: Determine who would be involved and who needs the training. Have policies or staff changed?

  • Police
  • Fire
  • Business and Industry
  • Public Works
  • Airport
  • EMO
  • Red Cross
  • Hospital
  • EMS
  • Public Transportation
  • School District
  • Surrounding Jurisdictions
  • Volunteer Organizations
  • Others

Exercise type: Determine which exercise to conduct. At what level is the exercise experience to be…a tabletop, a seminar, or a functional exercise? How much time can be allocated for development? Is a certain type required to fulfill compliance?

  • Seminar
  • Drill
  • Game
  • Tabletop
  • Functional
  • Full-scale

Appendix 3: Phase 2, Step 2: Defining the Scope

  1. Type of Emergency: (Select one or at most two that are high priority, have not been exercised recently, or best support functions to be tested)
  2. Geographic Location: (Be specific; make sure it is logical for the hazard choice)
  3. Functions: (Choose the most important to be tested; three to five are usually sufficient)
  4. Personnel and Organizations: (Select those that would benefit most and match the functions to be tested)
  5. Exercise Type: (Consider the exercise experience of personnel involved and the desired degree of stress and complexity)

• Orientation Seminar

• Drill

• Table Top Exercise

• Functional Exercise

• Full Scale Exercise

Appendix 4: Phase 2, Step 3: Writing a Statement of Purpose

“The purpose of the proposed ______________ (type of exercise) exercise is to test and evaluate the following emergency functions:

By involving these personnel and organizations: _________________

In simulating a _____________ (exercise type) for _______________ (type of emergency)

at ________________ (geographic location/area) on_________________ (date).”

Appendix 5: Phase 2, Step 4: Define Objectives

Exercise Objectives

Objective #1:

Responsible Organization:

Objective #2:

Responsible Organization:

Objective #3:

Responsible Organization:

Appendix 6: Phase 2, Step 5: Compose a Narrative

Remember: The narrative is a brief description that will set the stage for the exercise. It provides background information about the emergency and helps participants approach the exercise as a real situation. At this stage, it is sufficient to just list key words.

Narrative Outline

Event:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Event details and progression:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

How you found out:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Response made:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Damage reported:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Sequence of events:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Current time:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Advance warning?:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Location:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Relevant weather conditions:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Other factors that would influence emergency procedures:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Predictions or expected outcomes:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Appendix 7: Phase 2, Step 6: Major and Detailed Events

Remember: It is important to review the exercise objectives. Keeping these objectives in mind will help in the development of the major events, followed by detailed events that could occur as a result of those major events.

Events

Major Event #1:

Detailed Events:

Major Event #2:

Detailed Events:

Appendix 8: Phase 2, Step 7: List Expected Actions

List of expected actions
Detailed Event
Expected Action
Organization
Objectives #
1
   
2
   
3
   
4
   
5
   
6
   

List of expected actions


Appendix 9: Phase 2, Step 8: Prepare Messages

Sample Message

Emergency Exercise

<Mayday Message>

To: Airport Control Tower

From: Pilot in plane

Method: Radio

No: 1

Time: 10:55 am

Content: “Mayday! Mayday! This is flight 456. Flight emergency. Feeling major vibrations on plane. Request emergency clearance to land immediately.”

Action Taken: This message should trigger the expected actions to be taken by the control tower to:

  1. Notify pilot of landing permission
  2. Notify police, fire, medical to proceed to airport
  3. Alert hospitals of potential mass casualty incident

Phase 2, Step 8: Prepare Messages

Emergency Exercise

<Message>

To:

From:

Method:

No:

Time:

Content:

Action Taken:

Appendix 10: Phase 2: Master Scenario Events List

Outline the events, messages, and expected actions in sequence according to the time they would occur.

Master scenario events list

Event ID

Time

Message/Event

Expected Actions

1

   

2

   

3

   

4

   

5

   

Master scenario events list

Appendix 11 :Phase 2, Documentation: Exercise Plan

Exercise Name: __________________________________

General Section

This Exercise Plan identifies policies, procedures, administrative requirements, and exercise roles and responsibilities that will support exercise-planning initiatives.

Exercise Type

The exercise to be conducted is a:

  1. Orientation
  2. Drill
  3. Tabletop
  4. Functional
  5. Full-Scale

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this exercise is:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

The responsibilities of the Evaluation Team are:

  • Observe the exercise
  • Report what went well and what went poorly
  • Monitor decisions made in the exercise and then report on them

Scenario Narrative

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Scope

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

List of Exercise References

[The following are types of references to be listed.]

  • Model Community Information
  • Control Plan
  • Exercise Evaluation Plan
  • Exercise Scenarios
  • Job Aids

Assumptions, Artificialities, and Simulations

The assumptions, artificialities, and simulations applicable during the exercise are provided in the following paragraphs.

[The following assumptions are fairly generic; you may modify and/or add specifics for your own exercise.]

Exercise Assumptions

The following assumptions must be made in order to ensure that the exercise is as realistic as possible. It is intended that exercise events progress in a logical and realistic manner and that all exercise objectives be achieved during exercise play.

  • Exercise participants are well versed in their own organizational response plans and procedures.
  • The term “participants” includes planners, controllers, simulators, evaluators, and players.
  • Players and controllers will use real-world data and information support sources.
  • Players will respond in accordance with the existing Emergency Plan.
  • Implementation of disaster response plans, policies, and procedures during the exercise will depict actions that would be expected to occur under actual response conditions and, therefore, will provide a sound basis for evaluation.
  • Actions to direct unit, personnel, or resource deployments will result in simulated movement during the exercise unless live deployment in real time is stipulated to achieve an exercise objective.
  • Real-world response actions will take priority over exercise actions.

Exercise Artificialities

It is recognized that the following artificialities and constraints will detract from realism; however, exercise planners should accept these artificialities as a means of facilitating accomplishment of exercise objectives.

[This section will be based upon your extent of play agreements and include any pre-exercise player activity or pre-positioning of equipment. The following are examples.]

  • The exercise will be played in near-real time; however, to meet exercise objectives, some events may be accomplished by participants before the exercise, and other events may be accelerated in time to ensure their consideration during play.
  • Responses obtained by players from simulations may not be of the quality or detail available from the real organization or individual.
  • During the exercise, actions may occur to direct unit, personnel, or resource deployments, and subsequent movement of resources may be played; however, these actions may be simulated with no live movement occurring in the exercise.
  • Some personnel and equipment may be pre-positioned at exercise locations rather than moved in real-time during the exercise, and they will enter play at predetermined times from their pre-positioned locations. When this exercise artificiality occurs, it will be referred to in exercise documentation as exercise pre-positioning to differentiate it from the live deployments that will be evaluated.

Exercise Simulations

Simulation during exercises is required to compensate for nonparticipating individuals or organizations. Although simulations necessarily detract from realism, they provide the means to facilitate exercise play.

[Describe, in general, any areas that will be simulated. Examples include weather information, simulation of nonparticipating organizations, media, victims, evacuees, etc.]

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Exercise Objectives

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Exercise Players and Organizations Participating in Exercise

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Management Structure

Overall exercise planning, conduct, and evaluation for the exercise is the responsibility of the ___________________ [insert title], who is/are responsible for coordinating all exercise planning activities.

Exercise Team Staffing, Rules, and Procedures

[You may adapt the following text and charts to reflect your exercise management structure.]

The personnel selected as exercise team members must be knowledgeable of emergency management and response functions. They need this knowledge to understand ongoing exercise activities and to be able to track them. In order to meet this need, individuals who meet these requirements may be recruited from nonparticipating (or participating) emergency response organizations.

The exercise team will identify rules or guidelines for conduct during the exercise and will identify procedures of the exercise—before, during and after.

The following team structure will be used. [Identify exercise control team organization. Modify the chart below to reflect organization. Specific action sites should be added, such as individual organizations’ EOCs. If one simulation cell is used for all locations, modify the chart accordingly]

Exercise Design Structure

Exercise Design Team – Has the following responsibilities:

  • Responsible for coordinating all exercise planning activities. The Exercise Director will assign exercise tasks and responsibilities, provide guidance, establish timelines and monitor the development process.
  • Responsible for developing the exercise objectives, concepts, scenarios, master scenario events list, exercise messages administrative support requirements, communication methods.

Control Plan – Prepared by the Exercise Design Team and should include:

  • Exercise control and simulation activity management.
  • Provisions for controller/simulator training and briefing.
  • Procedures for monitoring and reporting of exercise activities to include the flow and pace of the exercise.
  • Procedures to track the accomplishment of exercise objectives.
  • Procedures to record the responses of players
  • Procedures for message injection, including the development of ad hoc messages to support exercise objectives.
  • A list of required exercise forms, including instructions for use and preparation.
  • Preparation for the critique.

Evaluation Plan - The Exercise Design Team is responsible for the development of the Evaluation Plan.

The plan should include all evaluation activities that should occur before, during, and after the exercise. Evaluation activities should include but not be limited to the following:

  • Procedures for monitoring and evaluating exercise activities
  • Procedures to track the accomplishment of exercise objectives
  • Procedures to record and evaluate the responses of players
  • Procedures to track message injection, including the development of ad hoc messages to support exercise objectives A list of required exercise forms, including instructions for use and preparation
  • Preparation for the debrief

Player Handbook – The Exercise Design Team is responsible for developing the player handbook.

The player handbook should contain a list of instructions for players and provide information regarding player responsibilities and functions to be performed during the exercise. The handbook should contain but not be limited to the following:

  • Scenario overview
  • Exercise objectives
  • Administrative requirements

Evaluation Team – The Evaluation Team is responsible for the development of the Evaluation Plan.

The plan should include all evaluation activities that should occur before, during, and after the exercise. Evaluation activities should include but not be limited to the following:

  • Exercise evaluation activity management
  • Provisions for evaluator training and briefing
  • Procedures for monitoring and evaluating exercise activities
  • Procedures to track the accomplishment of exercise objectives
  • Procedures to record and evaluate the responses of players
  • Procedures to track message injection, including the development of ad hoc messages to support exercise objectives
  • A list of required exercise forms, including instructions for use and preparation
  • Preparation for the critique

Participant Support Team – The participant support team is responsible for coordinating exercise support activities.

This team works with the other teams to develop consistent staff briefings for the controllers, simulators, evaluators, and participants and develops the player handbook.

The player handbook should contain a list of instructions for players and provide information regarding player responsibilities and functions to be performed during the exercise. The handbook should contain but not be limited to the following:

  • A schedule of player exercise briefings
  • Provisions for review of community or organization plans, policies and procedures
  • Scenario overview
  • Exercise objectives
  • Procedures for preparation of exercise-generated messages, logs, and reports
  • Emergency Operating Center procedures
  • Expected player actions
  • Administrative requirements
  • Recommended pre-exercise training events

Safety and Security

[Describe the safety procedures, if applicable, and the procedure and code to cancel the exercise if an actual emergency occurs. Detail any special security issues involved with the exercise, location, or equipment.]

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Administrative and Logistical Support Requirements

Administrative and logistical support consists of personnel, equipment, supplies and facilities. Administrative and logistical support will be required to support all phases of the exercise, including:

  • Administrative support at exercise locations/action sites
  • Personnel to assist with pre-exercise training registration, training, and packaging of training materials
  • Information on facilities (rooms etc.) for the exercise

Job Aids

[List any aids that will assist the design team.]

  • Provided for key functions and responsibilities for players, facilitator, and evaluators.

Appendix 12: Phase 2, Documentation: Player Handbook

Exercise Name:

Purpose

The purpose of this handbook is to provide the exercise players with the information needed for them to participate in the exercise.

Type of exercise:

Scope

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Concept of Play

The scenario will require the following titles/positions in the exercise:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Assumptions, Artificialities, and Simulations

The assumptions, artificialities, and simulations applicable during the exercise are provided in the following paragraphs.

[The following assumptions are fairly generic; you may modify and/or add specifics for your own exercise.]

Exercise Assumptions

Exercise players will respond in accordance with the existing Emergency Plan. In the absence of applicable plans, procedures or policies, players will be expected to apply individual and/or team initiative to satisfy response requirements.

Coordination of response activities will be required to ensure effective response.

Exercise Artificialities

It is recognized that certain artificialities and constraints will detract from exercise realism. However, exercise players are to accept these artificialities as a means of facilitating the accomplishment of the exercise objectives and performance criteria.

Exercise Simulation

Simulation during this table-top exercise is required to compensate for non-participating organizations, individuals, and units that would actually be deployed in a real-world response. Although simulations may detract from exercise realism, the simulated incidents, messages from and to simulated entities, provide the means to facilitate exercise play and provide for the testing of exercise objectives and performance criteria.

Scenario Narrative

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Reporting

Players should keep staff duty logs, staff officer action logs/reports, minutes from staff meetings, and telephone conversation records.

Administrative Systems

To assist in the conduct of the table-top exercise, the room set up will include name tags, copy of emergency plans, chart paper, office supplies, any required audiovisual equipment, and refreshments for participants. The facilitator will go over logistical details, including location of washrooms prior to the exercise.

Appendix 13: Phase 2, Documentation: Control Plan

Exercise Name: _______________________________________

Purpose and Scope

This plan provides exercise facilitators with guidance concerning procedures and responsibilities for exercise control, simulation, and support.

Overview

Type of exercise: _______________________________________

Exercise date: _________________________________________

Scope

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Scenario Narrative

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Exercise Players and Organizations Participating in Exercise

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Guidelines for Emergency call-off

The facilitator may suspend play or end the exercise at any time when it appears that a real-world emergency may affect exercise play. Participating organizations also have the option of withdrawing any of their players from the exercise at any time to address matters or concerns directly related to their emergency response missions.

Assumptions, Artificialities, and Simulations

The assumptions, artificialities, and simulations applicable during the exercise are provided in the following paragraphs.

[The following assumptions are fairly generic; you may modify and/or add specifics for your own exercise.]

Exercise Assumptions

The following assumptions are made in order to ensure that the exercise is as realistic as possible and that exercise objectives be achieved during exercise play.

  • Players will respond in accordance with the existing Emergency Plan. In the absence of appropriate written instructions, players will be expected to apply individual initiative.
  • Implementation of disaster response plans, policies, and procedures during the exercise will depict actions that would be expected to occur under actual response conditions.
  • Real-world response actions will take priority over exercise actions.

Exercise Artificialities

While the following artificialities and constraints will detract from realism, exercise planners should accept these artificialities as a way to meet exercise objectives.

  • The exercise will be played in near-real time; however, to meet exercise objectives, some events may be played by participants before the exercise, and other events may be accelerated in time.
  • Responses obtained by players from simulations may not be of the quality or detail available from the real organization or individual.
  • During the exercise, actions may occur to direct unit, personnel, or resource deployments, and subsequent movement of resources may be simulated with no live movement occurring in the exercise.

Management Structure

Overall exercise planning, conduct, and evaluation for the exercise is the responsibility of the Exercise Team. The team is responsible for coordinating all exercise planning activities.

Master Scenario Events List Procedures

The exercise will be managed by the Master Scenario Events List (MSEL), the primary document used to manage the exercise, to know when events are expected to occur, and to know when to insert messages into the exercise. All events listed in the MSEL are in chronological sequence.

Time

  • The time is the date and time expected to inject the event into exercise play. For expected player actions, this is the approximate time by which the expected action is to have occurred.

Message/Event

  • Phone or Radio - some messages will be delivered via telephone or radio.
  • Message or Fax - some messages, designed to simulate electronic messages, memoranda, and news bulletins, may be handed to appropriate players at designated times.
  • Video - video may be used for news updates.
  • Player Action - events will be monitored to ensure that players take the required action to maintain the pace of the exercise and to ensure objectives are met.

Expected Action

  • The expected action describes results expected from the MSEL event. It is used by evaluators to determine the effectiveness of an event.

Facilitating the Exercise

After presentation of the scenario, the exercise begins. The focus of the exercise is to test:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Questions to ask the players to begin play and to keep the exercise focused:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Attach a copy of:

  • MSEL
  • Expected actions
  • Major and detailed events
  • Key messages

Appendix 14: Checklist-Control/Simulation Plan

Your Control/Simulation plan should include, but not be limited to the following:

  • Exercise control and simulation activity management.
  • Provisions for controller/simulator training and briefing. Procedures for monitoring and reporting of exercise activities to include the flow and pace of the exercise.
  • Procedures to track the accomplishment of exercise objectives.
  • Procedures to record the responses of players.
  • Procedures for message injections, including the development of ad hoc messages to support exercise objectives.
  • A list of required exercise forms to include instructions for use and preparation.
  • Preparation for the critique.

Appendix 15: Phase 2, Documentation: Evaluation Plan

Exercise Name:

Purpose

This plan provides exercise evaluators, facilitator, and simulators with guidance concerning procedures and responsibilities for exercise evaluation and support.

Play Concept

Overview

Type of Exercise: ________________

Exercise Date: ___________________

Scope

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Scenario Narrative

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Exercise players and organizations participating in exercise

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Assumptions, Artificialities, and Simulations

The assumptions, artificialities, and simulations applicable during the exercise are provided in the following paragraphs.

Exercise Assumptions

The following assumptions are made in order to ensure that the exercise is as realistic as possible and that exercise objectives be achieved during exercise play.

  • Players will respond in accordance with the existing Emergency Plan. In the absence of appropriate written instructions, players will be expected to apply individual initiative.
  • Implementation of disaster response plans, policies, and procedures during the exercise will depict actions that would be expected to occur under actual response conditions.
  • Real-world response actions will take priority over exercise actions.

Exercise Artificialities

While the following artificialities and constraints will detract from realism, exercise planners should accept these artificialities as a way to meet exercise objectives.

  • The exercise will be played in near-real time; however, to meet exercise objectives, some events may be played by participants before the exercise, and other events may be accelerated in time.
  • Responses obtained by players from simulations may not be of the quality or detail available from the real organization or individual.
  • During the exercise, actions may occur to direct unit, personnel, or resource deployments, and subsequent movement of resources may be simulated with no live movement occurring in the exercise.

Exercise Evaluation Team Staffing, Rules, and Procedures

The personnel selected as exercise evaluation team members will need to understand ongoing exercise activities and to be able to track them with events in the MSEL.

Evaluators should be familiar with the following:

  • Purpose and objectives of the exercise
  • MSEL and scenario timeline
  • Content of exercise messages
  • Procedures for monitoring and tracking player actions
  • Procedures for recording observation of player actions
  • Procedures for notifying facilitator of problems and exercise deviations

In this section identify the exercise objectives and evaluator checklists. Points of review should be based on the emergency operations plans, policies, procedures, guidelines, and checklists.

Prior to the exercise, all exercise evaluation documents should be appended to the plan. They may be organized by site location, by function, or any other method as determined by the evaluation team.

Exercise Objectives

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Exercise Evaluation Team Responsibilities

  • Observe the exercise
  • Report what went well and what went poorly
  • Monitor decisions made in the exercise and then report on them

Reporting Procedures

Evaluators may record their observations on paper, or through the use of an Evaluator Reporting Checklist.

Attach a copy of:

  • MSEL
  • Expected actions
  • Major and detailed events
  • Key messages

Appendix 16: Phase 2, Documentation: Evaluation Plan

Evaluator Reporting Checklist

Evaluator: _____________________

Date: _________________________

Location: ______________________

Exercise: ____________________

Objective No.:

  • _________________________
  • _________________________

Objective: _______________________________________

Detailed Event

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Did the participants meet the Expected Action for this event?

Please answer the following:

Y=Yes, N=No, NA=Not Applicable, NO=Not Observed

Expected Actions:

  1. _____________________________ - Y / N / NA / NO
  2. _____________________________ - Y / N / NA / NO
  3. _____________________________ - Y / N / NA / NO
  4. _____________________________ - Y / N / NA / NO

Comments:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Appendix 17: Phase 3: Checklist-Facilitator Tasks

  • Provide briefings and debriefings for all exercise players which includes coordinating the evaluation of each exercise day by players.
  • Provide exercise inputs in line with the Master Scenario Events List (MSEL).
  • Monitor progress of the exercise as appropriate.
  • Ensure that actions expected from exercise inputs are completed.
  • Ensure the effective delivery of exercise responses by appropriately coaching exercise participants if or when required.
  • Report to the Exercise Planning Team.
  • Resolve problems and/or issues should the exercise go off track at their site, seeking advice from Exercise Planning Team as required.

Appendix 18: Phase 3: Checklist-Facilitator Tasks (Detailed)

The following is a more in-depth, comprehensive Facilitator checklist. Though quite detailed, it can be modified to suit the needs of your particular exercise, its objectives and degree of complexity, and your available resources.

Facilitator checklist
Before the exercise
Date
Steps to Perform
Notes:
1
 
Review exercise process to improve your familiarity and comfort level.
 
2
 
Review Emergency Plan, procedures,
and other documents needed to support the exercise.
 
3
 
Read the exercise materials from
“cover to cover.”
 
4
 
Develop intimate knowledge of the
scenario.
 
5
 
Review the exercise materials
to ensure a clear understanding of each element of the package.
 
6
 
Review purpose. What is driving the training?
 
7
 
Review scope.
Who is to be involved?
When and where is training needed?
What are the limitations?
 
8
 
Review the objectives.
 
9
 
Become familiar with the list of participants and their responsibilities.
 
10
 
Review all instructions.
 
11
 
Review the scenario including supporting elements.
 
12
 
Review timeline of major events and expected actions.
 
13
 
Review messages or injects.
 
14
 
Review Master Scenario Events List (MSEL), including time for messages to be injected, who delivers messages and to whom and how, expected actions.
 
15
 
Review any exercise data, such as maps, photos, audiovisual.
 
16
 
Review administrative information.
 
17
 
Review logistics information, such as procurement of equipment, materials and supplies, communications, facilities, etc.
 
18
 
Review acronyms and definitions used in the exercise.
 
19
 
Conduct a mental dry-run of the exercise.
 
Immediately Before the Exercise-Setting Up
Date
Steps to Perform
Notes:
1
 
Ensure that training supplies are available as needed.
 
2
 
Post a “Training in Session” sign on the outside of the door.
 
3
 
Write the Facilitator name on flipchart paper or blackboard, etc.
 
4
 
Write and post the exercise objectives.
 
5
 
Arrange the tables, chairs, projector, laptop, etc.
 
6
 
Do a sound, equipment, and message transmission check.
 
7
 
Ensure that there are sufficient copies of handouts for the exercise, including the Player Handbook.
 
8
 
Ensure that several copies of needed documentation, such as procedures and Emergency Plan, are in the room.
 

Day of the Exercise-Completing Administrative Tasks

Date
Steps to Perform
Notes:
1
 
Inform participants about the parking policy, smoking policy, locations of restrooms, availability of phones, and locations of emergency exits.
 
2
 
Circulate the participant list for signature, and contact information.
 
3
 
Review the exercise process.
 
4
 
Be aware of the potential for unknowingly influencing players.
 
Day of Exercise
Date
Steps to Perform
Notes:
1
 
Use clear, appropriate language and terminology.
 
2
 
Do not prompt players.
 
3
 
Establish hierarchy of control.
 
4
 
Set rules for player interaction.
 
5
 
Provide adequate supporting information.
 
6
 
Present the goal or purpose of the exercise.
 
7
 
Present the scope of the exercise.
 
8
 
Present the objectives of the exercise.
 
9
 
Direct the exercise.
 
10
 
Present selected information from the scenario as an introduction to the players. This may be in the form of a briefing or by a news flash, etc.
 
11
 
Keep a running log of activities.
 
12
 
Set the pace through controlling flow of messages, injects, and discussion among players.
 
13
 
Give out information and pre-planned messages.
 
14
 
Confirm objectives are achieved.
 
15
 
Keep play on track with the MSEL.
 
16
 
Be prepared to discuss “on-the-fly” problems.
 
17
 
Set clear limits on independent decision making and scenario modifications.
 
18
 
Adjust pace to player proficiency.
 
19
 
If the expected action is not performed, submit a contingency message.
 
20
 
Halt the play according to schedule.
 
After the Exercise-Conducting the Hot Wash
Date
Steps to Perform
Notes:

1

 

Set up flipchart or computer for the post-exercise hot-wash.

 

2

 

Assemble all players and evaluators.

 

3

 

Encourage participation by all players.

 

4

 

Review the objectives of the exercise.

 

5

 

Review the purpose of the exercise.

 

6

 

Remind participants that lessons learned during the exercise and the hot-wash discussion will be documented and will be incorporated in the After Action Report (AAR), along with the Evaluator comments.

 

7

 

What went right? What didn’t?

 

8

 

Were the objectives clear? Measurable? Attainable?

 

9

 

Were the objectives met?

If not, why?

What is needed to meet the objectives?

If the objectives were met, what improvements are suggested?

 

10

 

Did all players understand their roles?

 

11

 

How well did the players interact?

 

Exercise Summary

Date

Steps to Perform

Notes:

1

 

Sincerely thank team members and observers.

 

Facilitator checklist

Appendix 19: Phase 3: Checklist-Evaluator

  • Review evaluation plan and control plan materials. Attend evaluator training.
  • Perform duties under the management of the evaluation team leader at the assigned location.
  • Observe assigned objectives.
  • Monitor player actions and assist the evaluation team leader and other exercise control team members in tracking exercise events.
  • Report to the evaluation team leader any problems or issues that arise concerning control, including deviations from the scenario or exercise artificialities that may interfere with exercise realism or exercise progress, and record these problems in the evaluator log.
  • Provide observations using a key player observation and comment form for input to the exercise evaluation.
  • Attend the end-of-exercise participant debriefings/critiques, and any evaluator debriefings as instructed by evaluation team leader.
  • Review simulator materials and attend training.
  • Perform duties under the management of the [identify title of person] at the assigned location.
  • Answer (if allowed) inquiries from participants for general information, or information concerning Master Scenario Events List (MSEL) events already injected into play, and record inquiry in a log.
  • Record actions and/or decisions on tactical maps, situation status boards, resources status boards, and logs.
  • Assist controllers in monitoring the flow of the exercise and completion of Master Scenario Events List (MSEL) events.
  • Inform evaluation team leader of possible deviations from the Master Scenario Events List (MSEL) and expected actions.
  • Record observations using evaluator checklists provided.
  • Complete summary forms for input to the exercise evaluation report.

Appendix 20: Checklist-Lead Evaluator Tasks

  • Determine the qualifications and experience level of evaluators needed and identify avenues for obtaining them.
  • Design and develop training for the exercise evaluators.
  • Develop procedures for debriefing of players and exercise evaluation team.
  • During the exercise, manage and coordinate activities of the exercise evaluator team to ensure that exercise play achieves exercise objectives.
  • Monitor exercise progress and make decisions regarding any deviations or significant changes to the scenario caused by unexpected developments in the course of play.
  • Coordinate any required modifications to the Master Scenario Events List (MSEL) and supporting event implementers with the appropriate exercise evaluators.
  • Conduct debriefing of exercise evaluation team.
  • Provide observations for input to the exercise evaluation using the key player observation and comment form.
  • Complete routine reports to log exercise events and any special reports, as necessary.
  • Conduct control and simulation debriefings for subordinate controllers/simulators.
  • Chair the post-exercise critique session at assigned location.
  • Attend evaluation team debriefings.

Appendix 21: Checklist-Evaluation Team Tasks

  • Participate in the exercise design team (lead evaluator).
  • Analyze and assess the exercise plan to determine an appropriate evaluation strategy (locations of evaluation, number of evaluations required, roles and responsibilities, etc.).
  • Develop and disseminate the exercise evaluation plan.
  • Establish evaluator communications systems and information support mechanisms.
  • Design and develop the evaluation organization and chain of command.
  • Define the roles and responsibilities of the exercise evaluation team, including evaluation team chiefs and evaluators.
  • Develop policies, guidelines, and procedures for implementing the exercise evaluation plan.
  • Develop the administrative and logistic systems needed for reporting, problem resolution, and safety and site preparation for participating organizations and evaluation organizations.

Appendix 22: Phase 3: Hot-wash

Did we meet the objective(s) that we set out for our exercise?

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

What worked well and why?

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Where can we improve and how?

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Appendix 23: Phase 4: After Action Report (AAR)

Executive Summary

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Note: The “Executive Summary” section is used to briefly describe a summary of the information contained in your After Action Report (AAR) to highlight the way in which the report will help in preparedness and should include the following:

  • Brief overview of the exercise
  • Major strengths demonstrated during the exercise
  • Areas that require improvement

Exercise Overview

Exercise Name:

Duration:

Exercise Date:

Sponsor:

Type of Exercise:

Funding Source:

Focus:

Scenario:

Location:

Participating Organizations:

Participants:

Number of Participants:

Exercise Overview:

Exercise Evaluations:

Note: The “Exercise Overview” section should be used to briefly describe the following:

  • Describes the specific details of the exercise
  • Identifies the organizations that participated in the exercise
  • Describes how the exercise was structured
  • Describes how the exercise was implemented and carried out

Listed above are the details that are required in the AAR “Exercise Overview” section.

Exercise Goals and Objectives

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Note: The “Exercise Goals and Objectives” section is used to briefly list the goals and objectives for the exercise. These are developed during the exercise planning and design phase and are used to define the scope and content of the exercise as well as the organizations that will participate. List each Goal followed by the Objective for the respective Goal.

Exercise Events Synopsis

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Note: The “Exercise Events Synopsis” section is used to provide an overview of the scenario used to facilitate exercise play and the actions taken by the players to respond to the scenario. The activities are presented in the general sequence and timeline that they happened at each site. The events synopsis provides officials and players with an overview of what happened at each location and when. It is also used to analyze the effectiveness of the response, especially the time sensitive actions. It provides a means of looking at the ramifications of one action not happening when expected on actions taken by other players and on the overall response. The “Exercise Events Synopsis” should include the synopsis, the modules for the exercise, and a timeline of events for each element of play.

Objectives-based Evaluations

Identify the changes/improvements needed in your emergency plans and procedures (ERP), if applicable, and any other applicable documents that may be evaluated.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Did the exercise meet its objectives?

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

(If applicable) Did the exercise:

  • Build on the lessons learned from previous exercises?
  • Enhance the awareness of and educate participants on emergency planning?
  • Allow participants to assess their ability to coordinate responded with other participating organizations?
  • Test the effectiveness of communication protocols and procedures between the EOC(s) and site(s)?
  • Allow you to identify areas in need of improvements in your plans?

Note: This section is used to analyze exercise objectives and design. You may choose to consider the above questions during this process.

Conclusions

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Note: The “Conclusions” section of the report should be used as a summary of all the sections of the AAR. It should include the following:

  • Participants demonstrated capabilities
  • Lessons learned for improvement and major recommendations

A summary of what steps should be taken to ensure that the concluding results will help to further refine plans, procedures, training for this type of incident

Appendix 24: Phase 5: Improvement Plan

Improvement Plan_____________
Organization:_________________
Improvement plan
Objective
Recommendations
Corrective / Improvement Action
Responsible Party
Projected Completion Date
1
    
2
    
3
    
4
    
5
    

Improvement plan

Appendix 25: Phase 5: Corrective Action Plan

Name of Exercise:_________________________
Date:____________________________________
Corrective Action Plan
Objective
Issue
Corrective Action
Primary Agency
Point of Contact and Phone
1
    
2
    
3
    
4
    

Corrective Action Plan

Appendix 26: Exercise Checklist

  • Agree upon the scenario, extent and aim of the exercise with senior management.
  • Assemble a multi-disciplinary exercise planning team and agree the objectives for each area to be exercised.
  • Sketch out and then develop the main events of the exercise and associated timetables.
  • Determine and confirm the availability of outside organizations to be involved, such as the media or voluntary agencies.
  • List the facilities required for the exercise and confirm their availability e.g. transportation, buildings and equipment
  • Ensure that all communications to be used during the exercise have been tested, and in the locations in which they will be used as near to the date of the exercise as possible.
  • Check that evaluators for each stage of the exercise are clearly identified and properly briefed.
  • Ensure that directing staff are clearly identified and properly briefed, and have good independent communications with 'exercise control' throughout the exercise.
  • If the exercise links a number of activities or functions which are dependent on each other, confirm that each has been individually tested beforehand.
  • Ensure that all participants have been briefed.
  • Ensure that all participants are aware of the procedures to be followed if a real emergency occurs during the exercise.
  • If observers are to be invited, including the media, ensure that they are clearly identified and properly looked after, and arrange for them to be kept informed of the progress of the exercise. Ensure their safety.
  • If necessary, such as for a longer exercise, arrange catering and toilet facilities.
  • Ensure that where appropriate outside agencies are indemnified in the event of exercise accident.
  • Warn the local media, emergency services switchboards/controls and any neighbours who might be worried or affected by the exercise. Position "Exercise in Progress" signs if appropriate.
  • Ensure that senior management, controllers and evaluators, and key participants are aware of the time and location for the “hot-wash”, and circulate a timetable for a full debrief.
  • Agree upon and prepare a detailed set of recommendations, each one accompanied by an action addressee and timescale.
  • Prepare a clear and concise summary report of the exercise to distribute to all organizations and groups which took part, together with major recommendations.
  • Discuss with senior management the outcome of the exercise and agree the future exercise program.
  • Thank all personnel and outside agencies which took part.

Appendix 27: Guidelines for Briefing Exercise Participants

These Guidelines can help you prepare for a pre-exercise briefing by adapting them for their own use. You need to include additional points relevant only to your organization and personnel.

It’s essential that all persons who will or could take part in an exercise are fully briefed. Failure to do so could lead to the possibility of litigation should someone who has taken part in the exercise suffer physical or mental injury, citing poor advanced preparation by the organizers as a contributory factor.

Your briefing must be fairly close to the exercise date (i.e. not more than one month beforehand). The degree to which participants are briefed will vary according to the type of exercise being held. For example, it’s unlikely that the same depth of briefing will be required for a table top exercise as for a live exercise.

Essential Briefing Points

A verbal and written list of all participants in the exercise should be presented at the beginning of the briefing. You’ll want to include the following in your main briefing:

The exercise will take place between the following dates ________________and/or the following times _________/_____________. The approximate duration of the exercise is __________________
The exercise code name is ________________ (e.g. "Exercise Canada Prepare"). The exercise code name should be used as a prefix on all written, radio, TV, and telephone messages relating to the exercise.
This is/is not a multi-organizational exercise. The other organizations involved are _____________________________________________.

The exercise scenario will/will not involve the following:

  1. Simulated casualties
  2. Hazardous substances
  3. Simulated hazardous substances
  4. Simulated fire/ smoke
  5. Flood

A safety officer will be present, identified by ________________
Exercise directors will be present, identified by ______________
Exercise observers will/will not be present identified by ____________
Any concerns regarding personal health and safety or the health and safety of others during the exercise should be drawn to the attention of the safety officer or an exercise director immediately. An assessment will then be made as to whether the exercise can continue.
If a genuine injury is sustained (as opposed to a simulated injury), use and repeat the code word "_______________" to attract attention - under no circumstances should these words be used by role playing casualties.
Notification of exercise suspension/abandonment / completion will be given by _______________ (e.g. code words or audible signals.)
****A health and safety risk assessment has been undertaken and your attention is drawn to the following (if applicable):

  • Protective clothing/equipment required, over and above standard issue
  • Areas of the site which are prohibited
  • Physical hazards on site _____________ (sharp points, trip hazards etc.)

All participants in the briefing now have the opportunity to raise questions relevant to health and safety.

Any participants who wish to raise concerns about their personal health and safety or to pose questions relevant to health and safety after this briefing but before the exercise should see _________________ or their manager.

Will all participants ensure that they have signed the briefing attendance sheet which will be kept on record?

(***) A "health and safety risk assessment" of the planned exercise is essential good practice. The method to undertake this should be an early consideration of the Exercise Planning Group. Each participating organization must assess whether there is a the need for an individual assessment or whether one organization (e.g. the Fire Department along with the site owners) should undertake the risk assessment and share information with other participating organizations.

Appendix 28: Exercise Timeline

Below is a sample timeline for an exercise program, followed by a template.

Sample timeline for an exercise program

Exercise Timeline

Year (Year in Cycle)___________________
Exercise Timeline Chart
Organization
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
1
            
2
            
3
            
4
            
5
            
6
            
7
            

Exercise Timeline Chart


Appendix 29: Organizational Chart-Exercise Planning Team

Example of an Organizational Chart for an Exercise Planning Team

The following is a sample organizational chart for an Exercise Planning Team. Though it presents some of the basic functions of an exercise planning team, it can be modified to suit the needs of your particular exercise, its objectives and degree of complexity, and your available resources.

Note that a more comprehensive organizational chart may be required for larger or full-scale exercises. For example, in addition to the involvement of police, fire, and EMS are part of Operations during an exercise, it may be of interest to you to involve other entities, such as public works and hospitals. For further support to the Planning team, exercise documentation and evaluation may be joined by a simulation team, particularly in larger exercises.

Furthermore, Logistics may be expanded to include transportation, public works, health (ie. food and water), security, and audio/visual, and Finance may be further responsible to address resources and purchasing, as required.

Sample: Organizational Chart-Exercise Planning Team

Sample Organizational Chart - Exercise Planning Team