Critical Infrastructure

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Ontario Government Emergency Fuel Distribution Protocol

Preface

This document was prepared by the Ministry of Energy (ENERGY) and Emergency Management Ontario (EMO). In the course of preparing this document, the Minis-tries requested and received information from various industry participants. How-ever, the views and statements in this document are entirely those of the Government of Ontario. They are not attributable to any industry participants.

EMO, part of the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services, in con-junction with ENERGY, have developed this fuel distribution Protocol in the event of a declared Provincial emergency with a fuel shortage.

EMO and ENERGY received information from the Ontario Division of the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI), and on an individual basis, from the four major oil companies (Imperial Oil, Shell, Suncor, and Ultramar) operating in Ontario that CPPI represents, as well as other oil companies. The information received from CPPI was generic publically available information about how the industry operates. In addition, individual oil companies provided information to ENERGY un-der strict confidence on a one on one basis.

This Protocol also incorporates resources of independent petroleum marketers that are represented by the Canadian Independent Petroleum Marketers Association (CIPMA). CIPMA members operate hundreds of retail fuel outlets throughout Ontario.

CPPI members are responsible for all the refining and much of the distribution operations in Ontario. CPPI members, CIPMA members and independent operators not represented by any other association, all have retail operations in Ontario.

In order to ensure compliance with the Federal Competition Act, CPPI has re-quested and EMO and ENERGY have agreed that they will seek any competitively sensitive information they require from oil companies on an individual basis, and will maintain all such information in strict confidence.

No competitively sensitive information from any oil company may be shared with any other oil company.

Competitively sensitive information includes, but is not limited to, information on pricing, market shares, customers, sales or marketing strategy, production levels or capacity, inventory levels, channels or methods of distribution, supply and demand levels, margins or prices at which products are resold, and responses to bids or tenders. It may also include information about the capability and capacity of facilities.

1.0 Introduction

For the purposes of this Proto-col, „fuel‟ refers to refined petroleum products, such as gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and heating oil but not crude oil.

A fuel supply shortage can be caused by failures in the distribution system (e.g. due to truckers‟ protests) and/or major disruptions to refinery operations (e.g. significant electrical outages or fire). During a declared emergency, supplies of fuel may become a government controlled commodity in order for communities and critical infrastructure (CI) sectors to maintain essential services.

2.0 Aim

The Protocol outlines how communities and designated CI sectors (Appendix A) will work towards prioritized fuel distribution in the event of a shortage in a declared Provincial emergency.

3.0 Authority

This Protocol is executed under authority prescribed by Ontario’s Emergency Management and Civil Pro-tection Act and its regulations.

4.0 Compliance with Federal ‘Energy Supplies Emergency Act’

In the event that the Governor in Council implements the Federal „Energy Supplies Emergency Act’ [R.S. 1985, c. E-9] in response to an exceptionally severe interruption in the supply of crude oil, this Provincial Protocol will be subject to and comply with any applicable measures that may result.

5.0 Imminent Fuel Shortage

Should a potential fuel shortage be the predictable result of circumstances that allow for advance notice, individual CPPI members shall advise ENERGY. In turn, ENERGY shall notify the Provincial Emergency Operations Centre (PEOC) Duty Operations Officer.

Should a fuel shortage be the sudden result of circumstances that provide no advance notice, ENER-GY will consult with PEOC and EMO staff to develop an effective strategy to mitigate the effects of the shortage.

6.0 Response Plan

EMO and ENERGY have developed a three tiered escalating response Protocol designed to facilitate emergency fuel distribution. This Protocol is consistent with EMO‟s doctrine of a „bottom-up‟ approach, where communities generally respond to incidents first before requesting assistance from the Province if the situation is beyond their capability. Critical infra-structure sectors are considered to be essential service providers and users of fuel.

Tier 1: CIs and communities have robust emergency Plans and are prepared to be self-sufficient for three days.

Tier 2: Communities and CIs are to assist each other through prearranged mutual aid assistance agreements. (Formal or informal agreements between CIs, as well as between communities, are also recommended.)

Tier 3: The PEOC shall assist CIs and municipalities as a last resort. PEOC will strategically prioritize requests.

EMO‟s doctrine also calls for individuals, businesses and communities to prepare for self sufficiency for three days. The doctrine also recommends that mutual aid assistance agreements should be developed as a best practice. CIs and communities should develop mutual aid agreements because most CIs re-side in the communities they serve and most re-sources are at the community level. Therefore, it is of mutual benefit to both parties. Appendix B highlights some of the best practices for CIs and communities to follow.

ENERGY estimates that only a small percentage of the approximately 3,800 retail gas stations in Ontario have backup power generators. ENERGY staff will obtain information from individual oil companies to prepare a list of retailers with backup genera-tors, which will be kept confidential by ENERGY Staff. In a declared emergency, this information will be used by Ontario

Government staff, as required, in a manner which best preserves public safety and confidentiality.

CI sectors with response vehicles that rely on fuel retailers and do not have their own fuel depots should develop mutual aid with communities they serve. CIs should also develop a list of retailers with backup generators in the area they serve. They can canvass branded and independent stations to determine if they have a generator.

Most communities have a designated emergency fuel depot with a backup power generator enabling it to operate during an electricity outage (Appendix C). These communities have established contracts with fuel suppliers. In most emergency situations, their regular supplier should be able to re-supply their fuel depot provided that the supplier has a robust contingency plan (see Appendix B for Best Practices for CIs and Communities).

At Tier 3, the PEOC can assist CIs and communities with their fuel requests. The PEOC will strategically prioritize the request and ENERGY will then contact the applicable CPPI member company emergency operations centre and attempt to arrange for fuel de-livery. Each oil company has individually designated emergency fuel distribution terminals in Ontario (Appendix D).

It is imperative that CIs and communities develop robust business continuity plans with strong fuel contingencies. It is important to utilize all possible re-sources before requesting assistance for fuel from the PEOC at Tier 3, because there may be many re-quests from CIs and communities and the PEOC will need to strategically prioritize these requests. Thus, fuel requests may not be filled on time.

The PEOC can work with appropriate Ministries to implement temporary waivers that will provide oil companies with flexibility to increase fuel supply and ease a severe shortage situation (Appendix E).

7.0 Notification

When a community or CI is unable to obtain fuel from its regular supplier and has exhausted all other re-source options such as an alternate fuel supplier, mutual aid from other communities, or other resource options as identified in their emergency plans, they shall advise the PEOC Duty Operations Officer at (416) 314-0472 or 1-866-314-0472.

The requesters should provide the following information to the PEOC: justification of need for priority, type of fuel, quantity required, expected operational time before depletion, name of regular supplier, location, contact information and other relevant information.

8.0 Communications

ENERGY will communicate with individual oil companies to ensure up-to-date and accurate information is provided to make appropriate decisions by Ministry senior management in conjunction with the PEOC Executive group, and in a manner that is fully compliant with the Competition Act.

The Ontario Emergency Management Structure will provide unified communication messages to all stake-holders that are consistent, clear, accurate and timely.

9.0 Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act

In a declared Provincial emergency, the Province may invoke emergency powers and orders under Section 7 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act to control the use and or distribution of fuel.

10.0 Protocol Review

In consultation with stakeholders, this Protocol shall be reviewed annually and updated as required by EMO and ENERGY. Any changes will be reviewed by stakeholders.

Appendix F contains a list of stakeholder responsibilities,

Appendix A - Critical Infrastructure Sectors

EMO has identified nine critical infrastructure sectors. The PEOC/EMO has not pre-determined the priority of these nine CI sectors. Depending on the nature of the emergency, priority will be determined at an appropriate time during a declared provincial emergency by strategic assessment

Continuity of Government (municipal, provincial and federal governments).

Electricity (nuclear, hydroelectric and fossil power generation; electricity transmission and distribution).

Financial Institutions (Bank of Canada, banks and trust companies, credit unions, caisses populaires, Province of Ontario Savings Office, inter-institution computer systems, insurance companies, mutual fund companies, stock exchanges).

Food and Water (water treatment, water storage, water monitoring, water distribution, waste water and sewage treatment, food production and harvesting, food processing and distribution, food inspection and monitoring).

Health (hospitals, ambulance services, pharmaceuticals, blood services, and long-term care facilities).

Oil and Natural Gas (oil refineries, distribution and retail operations; natural gas distribution).

Public Safety and Security (firefighting, police and emergency medical services, emergency operations and evacuation centres, Centre of Fo-rensic Sciences, Office of the Chief Coroner, military facilities, correctional facilities, search and rescue, flood and erosion control, pollution monitoring and public alerting, weather forecasting and public alerting);

Telecommunications (9-1-1 communications, telephones, wireless telephones, pagers, television stations, radio stations, internet); and

Transportation (highways and roads, snow removal services, rail-ways, public transit, airports, aviation communication and navigation, port facilities, canals and shipping locks, movable bridge systems, ferries, ma-rine communication and navigation, border controls);

The preceding list is in alphabetical order and not in prioritized order. Nevertheless, it is recognized that most of the CI sectors will be unable to operate without an ongoing supply of fuel. The list is a generic guide only and not intended to provide a complete and exhaustive description of all possible essential users in each CI sector.

Appendix B - Best Practices for Critical Infrastructure Owners and Operators & Communities

As part of the emergency planning process, communities and CIs should consider measures that can be taken in advance to mitigate the potential effects of a fuel shortage.

All communities and CIs should have a robust emergency preparedness and response plan to deal with threats.

Strategically located sources of auxiliary electrical power generators with adequate capacity and on-site fuel reserves can increase the robustness of continuity of operations.

Ideally, communities and CIs should prepare to be self sufficient for three days as prescribed by EMO guidelines.

The development of a robust business continuity plan (BCP) will enhance the operational resilience of or-ganizations.

Business Continuity Plans

BCP should consider and include the following:

  • Emergency management coordinator to develop and maintain BCP.
  • Hazard identification and risk assessment.
  • Mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery measures / strategies.
  • Identify all fuel supply vulnerabilities and prepare for them.
  • Establish firm contract with fuel supplier and en-sure supplier has a robust contingency plan. This could include backup power generators at retail sites and distribution terminals.
  • Identify, prioritize and reallocate resources (including staff) to deliver only critical services and products.
  • Reducing fuel usage and conserving where possible.
  • Improving the resilience of service contracts and supply chain management (not just fuel but other supplies the organization needs to deliver its key services and products).
  • Establish effective communication with staff, customers, suppliers and other key stakeholders in advance of and during a fuel supply disruption.
  • Ensure clear and concise pre-approved messages are ready, as well as a means of communicating them to key stakeholders.
  • Maintain emergency contact list of critical staff and stakeholders.
  • Maintain an emergency operations centre and al-ternate site.
  • Keeping a supply of critical parts / commodities to ensure continuity of service.
  • Mutual aid, sharing resources and or expertise with other organizations.
  • Keep details of alternative suppliers should primary supplier fail.
  • Car sharing or alternative modes of transport for essential staff.
  • Lodging facilities for critical staff.
  • Information technology plan / strategy.
  • Interdependencies with other CIs / organizations.
  • Incident management system.
  • Staff training and awareness.
  • Weather or seasonal patterns that may affect BCP.
  • Review and exercise BCP regularly.

Recommendations regarding Stationary Emergency Power Generators

  • Generators should be properly maintained and tested under load on a regular basis. Ensure fuel quality and quantity level are maintained.
  • CIs and communities should have a firm contract with a fuel supplier. They should ensure that their supplier understands that CIs and communities are a high priority in an emergency situation. They should also ensure their supplier has a robust contingency plan. The potential declaration of a Provincial emergency and the use of force majeure should be considered in contract discussions.
  • CIs and communities should consider diversifying the fuel supplies for their life-safety emergency and backup generation fleet by including continuously piped natural gas from the gas utility whose service is independent of the electrical grid. Retrofitting existing diesel generators to operate on a combination of diesel and natural gas, commonly referred to as bi-fuel or dual-fuel, may be practical. Its main advantage is to extend the run-time of the stored diesel fuel inventory and thus increase resiliency of operations.
  • Cls should develop mutual aid assistance agreements (where possible) with the community in which they serve. Communities should recognize that Cls are a priority in the response and recovery efforts and in most cases, Cls serve in their communities, thus it is of mutual benefit to both parties. Agreements between Cls, as well as between communities, are also recommended.

CI Response Vehicles

  • Vehicles’ fuel tanks should be filled to capacity at the end of each work shift.
  • CLS should develop a list of retail gas stations with backup power generators in the geographic area they serve. They can canvass branded and independent gas stations to determine if they have a generator. (There are hundreds of stations being operated by independent owner/operators that are not represented by CPPI, CIPMA or any other trade association.
  • Cls should develop mutual aid assistance agreements with the communities in which they serve. Agreements between Cls, as well as between communities, are also recommended.


Appendix C: Fuel Capability at Community Level

A survey was conducted to determine the fuel capability at the community level in February/March of 2007. The survey was forwarded to all 445 communities in Ontario via EMO. Responses from the survey provided a summary of fuel resources at the community level. The survey was crafted by ENEGY and CPPI

Analysis from the responses indicated the following:

  • 168 responses were completed, representing a response rate of about 38 per cent. This represents a sufficient sample size that may be indicative of the fuel resources at was forwarded to all 445 communities in Ontario via EMO. Responses from the survey provided a summary of fuel
  • Most communities have a designated emergency fuel depot with a backup power generator enabling it to operate during an electricity outage. These communities have established contracts with fuel suppliers. A few smaller communities rely on private retail outlets, probably due to a lack of resources. Larger communities have many municipally operated depots.
  • Community designated fuel depots mostly provide service to fire and road maintenance vehicles. Other first responder vehicles (police, EMS and utilities) not serviced by a municipal depot likely use retail outlets or card locks.
  • Most communities do not have a fuel delivery vehicle to supply stationary generators at hospitals and water and sewage treatment plants. They rely on their fuel supplier for delivery to stationary generators. A small percentage of communities have tanks attached to pickup trucks and are able to deliver to generators.
  • Most community fuel depots contain regular gasoline and on-road and off- road diesel. Their depots contain sufficient supply for their operational needs, able to sustain their vehicles for a number of days before the need to refuel storage tanks. Their usage is generally higher in the winter due to snow removal operations.
  • Most communities are receptive to mutual aid agreements with CI sectors. Some are receptive to assisting CI sectors without agreements with their fuel needs in the event of an emergency. Most communities advised that their own needs must be fulfilled first before assisting others.
  • Some communities will not be able to assist because they do not have a fuel depot or their capacity is insufficient. The decision to assist CIs usually needs the approval of their municipal council.
  • A small number of communities do not have a designated emergency fuel depot. They rely on a local fuel supplier through a contract arrangement or depend on retail service stations or card lock facilities to meet their needs.

These results suggest that most communities are fuel self sufficient for a few days. They are willing to assist CI sectors provided that their needs are met first. It is a good practice for CI sectors to arrange mutual aid agreements with communities, as most CIs serve communities and most resources reside at the com-munity level. Therefore, it is of mutual benefit to both parties.

Appendix D: Designated Emergency Distribution Terminals

Individual oil companies have designated nine terminals for fuel distribution in a Provincial emergency with a fuel short-age.

Designated Emergency Distribution Terminals

Company

Terminal Name

Terminal Location

Hard Wired for Generator

Generator On Site

Suncor

Oakville

Oakville

Yes

Yes

Suncor

Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay

Yes

Yes

Ultramar Ltd.

Maitland

Maitland

Yes

Yes

Ultramar Ltd.

Bracebridge

Gravenhurst

Yes

No

Ultramar Ltd.

Sudbury

Sudbury

Yes

No

Shell Canada

Sault Ste Marie

Sault Ste Marie

Yes

No

Suncor

Metro Depot

Toronto

Yes

Yes

Suncor

London

London

Yes

Yes

Imperial Oil

Ottawa

Ottawa

Yes

No

Designated Emergency Distribution Terminals

Terminal operations adhere to all government regulations/protocols/Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) requirements to ensure compliance and safety at all times:

  • All loading will be performed under the existing oil company specific protocols and procedures at the facility.
  • Tank farms will be manned; an operator will inspect for leaks hourly and will have two-way communications to the office.
  • All facilities have spill containment facilities, including but not limited to dikes, oil/water separators and controlled catch basins that comply with the LFHC.

Appendix E: Temporary Waivers from Governments

The following types of temporary waivers from Government may provide oil companies with flexibility to increase fuel supply and ease a severe shortage situation. Other waivers may be available to alleviate an emergency situation.

Gasoline Volatility Limit

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment can grant a temporary waiver of the gasoline volatility limit in the ethanol-in-gasoline regulation to allow the blending of ethanol with conventional gasoline, (ethanol is normally blended with a special, low-volatility blendstock known as RBOB to meet volatility limits) or the use of other components in gasoline to extend supply.

Liquid Fuels Handling Code

The Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) under the Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services can grant temporary variances under its Liquid Fuels Handling Code.

Hours of Service Rules for Fuel Haulers

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation can grant temporary provision to relax hours of service rules for fuel haulers that could maximize refuelling efficiencies to help in supply and delivery across the province.

Fuel Oil Regulation

The TSSA under the Ministry of Consumer Services can grant temporary variances under its Fuel Oil Regulation (Ontario Regulation #213/01, Technical Standards and Safety Act, 2000).

The regulation requires a fuel supplier to do a thorough inspection of a customer's fuel tank before delivering heating fuels like propane and heating oil. Regardless of whether the tank is underground or above-ground, the TSSA regulation requires fuel oil distributors to inspect all equipment to which they deliver fuel initially and at least once every 10 years.

A temporary variance could allow a fuel supplier to deliver to a CI location and waive the need to inspect the equipment when the location is not their regular customer. It may not be practical to conduct a thorough inspection in an emergency situation due to time and resource constraints.

Federal Fuel Regulations

Fuel regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) 1999 provide environmental benefits. Regulations covered include:

  • Gasoline Regulations: limits on lead and phosphorous
  • Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations: sulphur limits
  • Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulations: sulphur limits
  • Fuel Information Regulations No. 1: reporting on additives and sulphur levels
  • Future fuels regulations made under Division 4 (Fuels)
  • Benzene in gasoline limits.

CEPA provides for the possibility of waivers of fuel regulations. CEPA Section 147 provides for the granting of temporary waivers to regulations in the Fuels Division under “prescribed circumstances”.

Since regulations have not been passed to prescribe such circumstances, granting of waivers cannot be considered.

There may be circumstances when the Government of Canada may want to waive the fuel regulation. For example, in the event of a severe fuel shortage, relaxing fuel quality requirements may help with fuel sup-ply.

In order to use waivers, a regulation must first be developed setting out the circumstances under which a waiver may be granted.

If enabled, waivers would be available only for the fuels regulations under CEPA‟s Fuels Division.

Waivers cannot be applied to regulations made under CEPA Toxics Substance Part (Part 5) such as the Benzene in Gasoline Regulations.

A high threshold is set for waivers:

  • Waivers would only be possible under extreme circumstances (e.g. not just for economic reasons).
  • Should the circumstances occur, granting a waiver remains at the Minister’s discretion.
  • s.147 enables the Minister to waive any of the requirements of a fuels regulation
  • Administrative provisions could first be waived, e.g. reporting
  • Pollutant limits could later be waived if necessary, e.g. sulphur content

A waiver is available only under exceptional circumstances such as when Canada or a province/territory has declared a state of emergency.

Once an emergency has been declared, the Minister would then have discretion to grant a waiver. Factors to be considered by the Minister in granting a waiver:

Does the emergency relate to a fuel supply shortage?

Would the fuel shortage be alleviated by the granting of a temporary waiver?

Do the benefits of granting a waiver exceed the costs (e.g. of the resulting impacts on air pollution, the environment and health of Canadians)?

Implications of granting a waiver and provisions to mitigate damage.

Other Federal and U.S. Legislations/Regulations

It is important to note that some fuel made available under waivers may cause permanent damage to emissions control equipment on cars and trucks.

Other Federal and U.S. Legislations/Regulations

The following Federal and U.S. legislations/regulations would need to be explored:

  • Ethanol in gasoline waiver.
  • Truck weight waiver.
  • Cross border dangerous goods movements.
  • Export permits from the State of Michigan.
  • Diesel quality issues.

Appendix F: Stakeholder Responsibilities

EMO/PEOC Responsibilities

  • EMO to work with ENERGY to ensure that oil sec-tor critical facilities receive electricity restoration priority in the event of a disruption, in accordance with the documented Independent Electricity Sys-tem Operator’s (IESO) Ontario Electricity Emergency Restoration Plan, where oil refineries and pipelines are designated as “Priority Customer Loads”.
  • Assist communities, ministries and CI sectors with the development of their respective emergency fuel contingency plans.
  • Commissioner of EMO to make recommendations to the Lieutenant Governor in Council or the Premier to declare a Provincial emergency.
  • Commissioner of EMO to make recommendations to the Lieutenant Governor in Council to implement emergency powers if necessary.
  • Commissioner to provide leadership to all facets of the government’s emergency management response and recovery efforts.
  • Notification to all stakeholders the activation of the PEOC in a declared emergency.
  • Provide strategic priority policies for refueling CIs and communities. Communicate to stakeholders that CIs are a priority.
  • Assist in locating backup power generators for fuel distribution terminals and retail gas stations that are hard wired to accept a generator, if necessary.
  • Field Officers to assist communities with their fuel needs.
  • Assist CIs and communities in obtaining emergency fuel through the PEOC. Prioritize fuel requests.
  • Assist in arranging security and verification of fuel request at designated major distribution terminals, if necessary.
  • Maintain current 24/7 contact list of Community and Ministry Emergency Management Coordinators.
  • Coordinate with appropriate Ministries and/or Federal departments to implement temporary waivers to provide oil companies with flexibility to increase fuel supply.
  • Resolve any issues and/or priorities.
  • Lead in Ontario CI Assurance Program.

ENERGY Responsibilities

  • Maintain the ENERGY Emergency Response Plan which will include provisions for this Ontario Emergency Fuel Distribution Protocol. The Protocol will be reviewed and updated as needed, jointly with EMO.
  • Participate in the Ontario CI Assurance Program and other CI activities. Lead for the oil and natural gas sector network in the CI program.
  • Liaise with CI sectors, communities, ministries and other stakeholders to better understand interdependencies, address issues and assist in the development of their emergency fuel contingency plans.
  • Provide up-to-date primary and alternate ENER-GY emergency contact information to the PEOC Duty Operations Officer.
  • Provide current emergency contact information to CPPI and its member representatives and other oil sector stakeholders.
  • Advise the PEOC of potential or real fuel shortages. Consult with the PEOC in developing an effective strategy to mitigate and/or respond to the effects of the shortage.
  • Activate ENERGY Ministry Action Group and Emergency Operations Centre in support of emergency fuel management operations.
  • Communicate EMO/PEOC‟s strategic prioritization guidelines to CPPI members and other oil sector stakeholders.
  • Liaise between the PEOC and CPPI members with regard to filling fuel requests. Assist in re-solving issues.
  • ENERGY to work with the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) to ensure that oil sector critical facilities receive electricity restoration priority in the event of a disruption, in accordance with the documented IESO‟s Ontario Electricity Emergency Restoration Plan, where oil refineries, vital precursors and pipelines are designated as “Priority Customer Loads”.

CPPI Responsibilities

  1. Provide current primary and alternate CPPI and its members‟ emergency contact information to EN-ERGY.
  2. Provide current oil sec-tor critical infrastructure contact information to the Independent Electricity System Operator for priority system restoration on an annual basis (in writing). All information treated as strictly confidential and is not shared other than with IESO Command center.
  3. Participate in the following, together with no more than one CPPI member at a time:
  4. Critical infrastructure exercises;
  5. Attend regular meetings with ENERGY, IESO and EMO;
  6. Meet with other CI sectors to provide and explain general non-confidential oil industry information; and
  7. Attend EMO’s annual CI conference and workshop as appropriate

CIPMA Responsibilities

  1. with ENERGY and provide list of retail service stations with backup generator from its member companies.

Pipeline Operators Responsibilities

  • Participate in EMO‟s CI Assurance Program. Liaise through ENERGY with CI sectors and other stakeholders to address interdependency issues.
  • Advise the ENERGY of potential or actual emergency and provide status updates as required.

Individual Oil Companies‟ Responsibilities

  • Maintain individual emergency preparedness and response plans with backup power capability where possible.
  • Provide current primary and alternate emergency contact information to the ENERGY Sector Representative.
  • Advise ENERGY of potential or actual fuel short-ages and provide status updates as required.
  • Respond to fuel requests from the PEOC/ENERGY and provide updates on delivery status.
  • Maintain a list of retail service stations with back-up generators. Provide list to ENERGY on a one on one confidential basis.
  • Advise PEOC/ENERGY of any issues in fulfilling requests should they arise.
  • On an individual basis, participate with CPPI as described in CPPI responsibility #3 above.

Communities’ Responsibilities

  • Consider developing and maintaining emergency fuel mitigation, preparedness and response plan.
  • Consider developing mutual aid assistance agreements with other communities and CI sec-tors to increase resilience.
  • Must have a regular fuel supplier for their essential services and fuel depots and ensure that their supplier has a robust contingency plan.
  • Advise their local emergency responders (police, fire and ambulance) of available designated fuel depots, if available.
  • Forecast fuel requirements of essential community/municipal services and submit requests for emergency re-supply to their regular fuel supplier.
  • Through prearrange mutual aid assistance agreement, assist CIs that serve their community.
  • At tier 3, provide PEOC with detailed request for fuel for their community/municipal operations: justification of need for priority reasons, type of fuel, quantity required, expected operational time before depletion, name of regular supplier, location, contact information and other relevant information.
  • Develop priorities within each of their community/municipal business continuity operations and conserve fuel where possible.
  • Adopt best practices in business continuity planning.

CIs’ Responsibilities

  • Consider developing and maintaining emergency fuel mitigation, preparedness and response plans.
  • Consider developing mutual aid assistance agreements with communities and CIs and be able to tap into community designated fuel depots where available.
  • Must have a regular fuel supplier and ensure that their supplier has a robust contingency plan.
  • Forecast fuel requirements of essential service and submit requests for emergency re-supply to their regular fuel supplier.
  • Develop a list of retailers with backup generators in the area they serve. They can canvass branded and independent stations to determine if they have a generator.
  • At tier 3, provide PEOC with detailed request for fuel: justification of need for priority reasons, type of fuel, quantity required, expected operational time before depletion, name of regular supplier, location, contact information and other relevant information.
  • Develop priorities within their CI business continuity operations and conserve fuel where possible.
  • Adopt best practices in business continuity planning.

Ministries’ Responsibilities

  • Consider developing and maintaining emergency fuel mitigation, preparedness and response plans.
  • Consider developing mutual aid assistance agreements with communities and CIs to increase resili-ency.
  • Must have a regular fuel supplier and ensure that their supplier has a robust contingency plan.
  • Forecast fuel requirements of essential service and submit requests for emergency re-supply to their regular fuel supplier.
  • At tier 3, provide PEOC with detailed request for fuel: justification of need for priority reasons, type of fuel, capacity requirement, expected operation-al time before depletion, name of regular supplier, location, contact information and other relevant information.
  • Develop priorities within their Ministry business continuity operations and conserve fuel where possible.
  • Adopt best practices in business continuity planning.